Третья мировая война 1946 - Красная волна - Сталин атак впервые - Альтернативная история

Третья мировая война 1946 - Красная волна - Сталин атак впервые - Альтернативная история
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Monday, November 29, 2010

Small Arms by Mad Missouri

CONFIDENTIAL

WAR DEPARTMENT
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ORDNANCE
WASHINGTON
15 August 1946

FROM: Sub-Committee on Small Arms
TO: Chief of Ordnance
SUBJECT: RIFLE, U.S., CALIBER .30 M2-Limited Procurement of

1. DISCUSSION:

A. Based on the recommendation of Headquarters, Army Ground Forces originally submitted 20 July 1945, and resubmitted 30 May 1946 limited production contracts for 100,000 Rifle, .30 Caliber, M2 were issued 3 June 1946.


(1) Two 50,000 piece contracts were issued to Springfield Armory and Remington Arms Company for a total of 100,000 rifles.

(2) Springfield Armory delivered the first 2000 rifles on 20 July 1946. Remington Arms Company delivered its first 1500 rifles on 7 August 1946.

(3) Both entities believe they will meet contracted production requirements of 4,000 rifles per month within 60 days.

B. The initial 3500 rifles were shipped with required technical manuals and accessories to Spain on 13 August 1946.

(1) Each rifle was provided with seven 20 round magazines, a modified M1937 BAR belt, M1945 suspenders, new 7 inch M5 bayonet, bipod, cotton web sling and cleaning kit. The modified M1937 BAR belts have 3 single magazine pockets on each side. This was done to remind the troops that magazines for the M2 while similar in shape and size to those for the Browning Automatic Rifle are not interchangeable.

C. The production of these rifles should not have any long term effect on M1 rifle production. In addition to resumed production at the two former wartime manufactures (Springfield Armory and Winchester) new contracts totaling 3 million rifles have been award to Harrington & Richardson Inc., Savage Arms Company, and Remington Arms Company. It is expected that the monthly M1 rifle production will match the Second World War maximum wartime monthly production rate by November 1946. The end result being a monthly rate expected to be over twice the previous maximum rate by August 1947.

Sunday, November 28, 2010

Buffalo by Mad Missouri

Buffalo, New York
August 21th, 1946

It had taken a three full days longer than expected to get the Acting FBI Director to allow him to see the suspect. But on the positive side it had allowed him to send for two specialists.

Walter chuckled to himself, “If the bastard hadn’t refuse to speak, they wouldn’t have let us have a try.”

Officer Sanchez gave his boss an odd look, “What was that, Sir?”

“Nothing Fred just talking to myself.” Walter said.

Three bored looking FBI Agents stood guard before the door.

“Officers Walsh, Sanchez, Keller, Smith, and Lynch, Central Intelligence Agency, we are here to see the prisoner,” Walter Walsh said.

“Yes, Sir we were told you would be here this morning. The prisoner is inside,” answered one of the FBI Agents.

Behind the solid metal door room was a single table, a GI folding cot, and 2 chairs. The two chairs were taken up by another G-man and disheveled looking middle aged man with his left arm in a sling.

The G-man stood and offered his hand, “Special Agent Ryan, Sir. We have been expecting you.”

“Nice to meet you Agent Ryan,” Walter said. “What happen to his arm? He fall down?” “Does his jaw still work?”

“Go to hell.

His jaw works fine,” answered Ryan.

“Listen Walsh, I been ordered to turn the prisoner over to you jokers, and that’s fine, but don’t give me any of your shit. We had our best people questioning this murder from minute one. All he says is the same BS story.“

Walter laughed, “Thanks, Agent Ryan, why don’t you and your men go get something to eat. I think we can handle this now.”

“Smith, Lynch, go watch the door. No one enters this room until we are done,” Walther said.

“Yes Sir. We got it. Lynch get the grease guns out of the bag,” Smith said.

The two agent exit the room taking up position just outside, closing the door behind them.

Walter takes the chair formerly occupied by the G-man. He opens his brief case and take out a brown file folder.

“Mr. Anderson, my name is Walter Walsh, and I’m here is ask you some questions. Unlike our colleagues in the FBI we did our research. And we found some really odd things in your background. You have anything to tell us, before we begin?

No?

Ok, let’s see what we know is true: Mr. Thomas Arthur Anderson was born 1901, in Madison Wisconsin. He attended 5th Street Elementary school until the 8th grade. His parents died in 1917 in a fire. He has no close family. In 1918, at the age of 17, he joined the Army and was assigned to the 339th Infantry Regiment. This is where our story gets really interesting, Mr. Anderson. See the 339th Infantry Regiment didn’t go to France. It went to Russia as part of the American Expeditionary Force North Russia. And here is the main part I find interesting, Private Thomas Arthur Anderson was listed in the official records of the 339th Infantry Regiment as going missing after a battle in January 1919. The next time a Thomas A. Anderson shows up in any government records is when you bought that building in New Port in 1928 and started a small radio repair business. Where did the money to buy that building come from Mr. Anderson?

Still not talking?

OK. Let’s see you worked at the New Port Naval Station during the war as a civilian radio technician. Then you went back to the repair shop after the war ended. Then we can’t find anything on you until this event. You have anything to say?”

“No? OK. I see we are going to have to try another tactic. Let me introduce my two friends, the dark haired one is Officer Sanchez. He was a cook in my old unit during the war. As it turned out he was a horrible cook, but he had other useful skills. He was really good at getting information from the toughest Jap soldiers. The blond, now that’s Officer Keller he is a different story, he just joined our company. Officer Keller learned his skills hunting partisans in Yugoslavia. He’s not someone you want to make mad. Would you like to rethink your decision to stay silent?

No?

Are you sure?

Fair enough. ”

“Sanchez, I’m going to get some coffee. See that he has changed his mind by the time I get back.”